Oxygen levels

Oxygen levels

OK I know I am suppose to be on oxygen 24/7. I do not have a portable oxygen unit (long story) and I am still working part time 3 days a week. When I go into a convenience store on my way to work I often feel VERY dizzy. Almost to the point of passing out. Well I did check my O2 during one of these bouts and yep it was in the 70's. When I go from my car to my desk or my car to my home (I do have maybe 10 steps to climb) I get down in the 70's also. My question is at what level does it become… read more

A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

Hey Libby, that story sounds very familar. When i was first being tested to join my local clinic they had me do the "6 minute" walk test. They were baffled how i was walking and talking cause my stats were down in the 70's and i was telling them that i was used to feeling that way. They said that would explain why i was struggling, heart beat in my ears, red faced, and light headed while i was at work just before i was forced to retire! They informed me that i should try to keep my O2 stats at 88 as the bottom line and if they went below, to stop and purse lip breathe. So thats the measuring stick i operate my world on these days. It is difficult because sometimes you feel great and your stats are low, then the next time when you think your feeling depleted...their fine! Sorry to be so long winded, but im sure my experience will sound familiar to a bunch of folks that suffer from our condition! I hope that helps a little. ✌

posted 8 months ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

Nicola, I really have to disagree with your comment about not walking anywhere. You're absolutely right about using his O2 and getting his sats above 90, but one of the things she and any of us can do to help ourselves is to use the O2 and, with your doc's approval, begin an exercise program which will involve walking. Once she gets herself in better shape,she'll find that the walking she does won't be nearly as difficult.

The issue isn't dying or passing out, although they're possibilities. If she continues doing things the way she is, she's almost certain to have major heart issues and brain damage. That's why you use your O2!

posted 8 months ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

88 is generally considered to be the number, and some pulmonologists insist on 90. 88 is what Medicare requires for you to be eligible for supplementary O2. The problem with letting your saturation levels go as low as you have for as long as you have is the issue of right heart failure and brain damage. You really don't want either, and the way to avoid that is to use O2 as prescribed by your doc. I'd also suggest that you purchase an oximeter so you can keep track of your own saturation levels. Turning your O2 up when you need to is a good thing and we encourage people to do it as often as necessary.

posted 8 months ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

The best $80 bucks Canadian ( $5.00 US lol) on buying myself an "Oximetre" from the drug store. It measure your O2 stats and heart rate. I wear it the entire time im doing my exercise which is walking! When it drops below 88 I stop till it returns to plus 90's. The best part I use it for is when my anxiety is acting up and I feel like my breathing is poor. I just pop that thing on my finger and its a drug free re-assurance that im ok. Sometimes that little piece of mind is worth its weight in gold! I even keep spare batteries in my coat just in case im out and need to check. Exercise is not my friend but I feel amazing afterwards and as you improve, your quality of life will follow! Breathe free my friends! 😘

posted 8 months ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

If you are suppose to be on O2 you should be. As far as carrying those tanks around, I can't do it, so I go without. I shouldn't because I experience what you do. I had to pay a small fee for my O2 even with Medicare.

posted 7 months ago
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