Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyCOPDTeam
Real members of MyCOPDTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Does Anyone Use The Inogen Oxygen? Wondering If It's As Good As They Say. Does Insurance Cover It?

Does Anyone Use The Inogen Oxygen? Wondering If It's As Good As They Say. Does Insurance Cover It?

I am a candidate for oxygen and looking for more information about Inogen.

A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

Innogen are lightweight , but depending on how many LPM of oxygen you require may or may not produce enough oxygen . My Innogen is fine at sea-level for me but is pretty much useless at the 5,280 feet altitude where i live .

posted 22 days ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

Inogen makes both stationary and portable concentrators. The stationary concentrators are very similar to other units and Inogen does have a contract with Medicare to provide service and most insurance companies follow Medicare's lead. The POCs are lightweight, but only one produces more than the equivalent of 1LPM. If you're interested in a POC, you need to learn about them. Best source is www.pulmonarypaper.org and look for the May-June edition. Read everything Ryan Diesem writes; he's the expert in POCs.

posted 22 days ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

The Inogen brand is wonderful

posted 16 days ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

Margaret, Terminology is very important in learning to manage our Condition.
ONE word often has different meanings based on how we experienced things when that word was first used. FYI, Oxygen always exists in the "fresh air" we breathe at about 21% concentration. It is not "created from" anything but constantly increases OR is used up by breakdown of other molecules and compounds. Every where we are, Oxygen mostly comes from plants and trees, even though water has a lot in it too. But we're not Fish !! The remaining stuff in "Air" is mostly Nitrogen and our bodies actually need a lot of that too.
Anyway, the O2 concentrators discussed above work by passing room air through a chemical filter to remove all other molecules, creating a stream of air which is about 90-95% PURE Oxygen - aka Concentrated.
But THIS process is also the "Exchange" you keep referring to. It happens in the machine and the O2 produced only remains Pure for a short distance - through the hose of your machine to the tissues in your lungs. There it is again "exchanged", replacing Carbon Dioxide from the blood stream and other organs. The good "air" quickly degrades and the process has to repeat all over again. Here's an article describing just how complicated this process really IS when we don't have to think so hard about it:
https://teachmephysiology.com/respiratory-syste...
Let your equipment dealer guide you through selecting the right unit(s) for your home and outdoor activities based on your Doc's Rx prescription advising for O2 use.
Stay safe and Be well.

edited, originally posted 18 days ago
A MyCOPDTeam Member said:

MargaretMeekerArnold, Concentrators don't exchange O2 or air; they DO create O2 from room air. They ARE your supply of O2. There are stationary concentrators for home use and portable O2 concentrators (POCs) for out and about. The POC is your O2 source when you're out and about.

posted 18 days ago
Already a Member? Log in